Linux Shortcuts Every Newbie Should Know

Linux Shortcuts Every Newbie Should Know

One thing that Linux is not so popular of is that it has quite a few keyboard shortcuts that every Linux user should know. Here are a few examples of Linux shortcuts that will help anyone who uses Linux.

Switch to the first text terminal. Under Linux you can have several (6 in standard setup) terminals opened at the same time.

<Ctrl><Alt><Fn> (n=1..6)
Switch to the nth text terminal.

Print the name of the terminal in which you are typing this command.

Switch to the first GUI terminal (if X-windows is running on this terminal).

<Ctrl><Alt><Fn> (n=7..12)
Switch to the nth GUI terminal (if a GUI terminal is running on screen n-1). By default, nothing is running on terminals 8 to 12, but you can run another server there.

(In a text terminal) Autocomplete the command  if there is only one option, or else show all the available options.

Scroll and edit the command history. Press <Enter> to execute.

Scroll terminal output up. Work also at the login prompt, so you can scroll through your bootup messages.

Scroll terminal output down.

(in X-windows) Change to the next X-server resolution (if you set up the X-server to more than one resolution). For multiple resolutions on my standard SVGA card/monitor, I have the following line in the file /etc/X11/XF86Config (the first resolution starts on default, the largest determines the size of the “virtual screen”):
Modes “1024×768” “800×600” “640×480” “512×384” “480×300” “400×300” “1152×864”

(in X-windows) Change to the previous X-server resolution.

(in X-windows) Kill the current X-windows server. Use if the X-windows server crushes and cannot be exited normally.

Shut down the system and reboot. This is the normal shutdown command for a user at the text-mode console. Don’t just press the “reset” button for shutdown!

Kill the current process (mostly in the text mode for small applications).

Log out from the current terminal.  See also the next command.

Send [End-of-File] to the current process. Don’t press it twice else you also log out (see the previous command).